Course Work Period

The following requirements are for the general degree track.

No. Program Structure Credit Value Percentage
1 Fundamental 9 12.5%
2 Supporting 6 8.5%
3 Depth in Methodology 9 12.5%
4 Depth in domain/context 12 17%
5 Elective 18 25%
6 Dissertation 18 25%
Total Credit Value 72 100%

 

Fundamental Courses Description
Doctoral Seminar Examines core theory and contextual applications of the field of Supply Chain Management. Focuses on analysis of scholarship on key concepts such as planning and optimization, coordination, disruptions and resilience, as well as a critical look at the historical roots of the field and related areas such as Operations Research / Management, Strategic Management, and Public Policy.
Models, Data and Inference for Socio-Technical Systems Uses data and systems knowledge to build models of complex supply chain mechanisms and phenomena for improved design and decision-making. Enhances model-building skills, including: review and extension of functions of random variables, Poisson processes, and Markov processes. Moves from applied probability to statistics via Chi-squared t and f tests, derived as functions of random variables. Reviews classical statistics, hypothesis tests, regression, correlation and causation, simple data mining techniques, and Bayesian vs. classical statistics.
Social Science Concepts and Methods Subject Introduction to social science approaches to developing questions, designing research, and collecting data about supply chains. Overview of the different social science paradigms for developing research questions, as well as issues of measurement and research design. Covers various modes of data collection with emphasis on how the different elements of research design contribute to more powerful and persuasive results. Students develop skills in designing and completing social science-based research, as well as in critically assessing related work.

 

Supporting Courses Description
Introduction to Mathematical Programming Introduction to linear optimization and its extensions emphasizing both methodology and the underlying mathematical structures and geometrical ideas. Covers classical theory of linear programming as well as some recent advances in the field. Topics include simplex method, duality theory, sensitivity analysis, network flow problems, decomposition, integer programming, interior point algorithms for linear programming, and introduction to combinatorial optimization and NP-completeness.
Fundamentals of Probability Introduction to Probability Theory Topics include probability spaces and measures; discrete and continuous random variables; conditioning and independence; multivariate normal distribution; abstract integration, expectation, and related convergence results; moment generating and characteristic functions; Bernoulli and Poisson process; finite-state Markov chains; convergence notions and their relations; and limit theorems. Familiarity with elementary notions in probability and real analysis is desirable.

 

Depth in Methodology Courses Description
Econometrics The course covers Regression analysis, focusing on departures from the standard Gauss-Markov assumptions, and simultaneous equations. Regression topics include heteroskedasticity, serial correlation, and errors in variables, generalized least squares, nonlinear regression, and limited dependent variable models. Covers identification and estimation of linear and nonlinear simultaneous equations models. Economic applications are discussed.
Design of Field Research Methods Field research involves collecting original data (qualitative and/or quantitative) in field sites. This course combines informal lecture and discussion with practical exercises to build specific skills for conducting field research in organizations. Readings include books and papers about research methodology and articles that provide exemplars of field research. Specific topics covered include: the role of theory in field research, variance versus process models, collecting and analyzing different kinds of data (observation, interview, survey), levels of analysis, construct development and validity, blending qualitative and quantitative data (in a paper, a study, or a career), and writing up field research for publication.
Statistical Research Methods Single and multivariate statistical analysis, structural equation modeling, factor analysis are some of the topics that will be covered in this course. The main objective of the course is to introduce student to the statistical research methods and how they can design and conduct a large-scale survey and develop the theory based on statistical analysis.

 

Alternative Research Tracks

The MISI PhD program offers four alternative tracks for completing the doctoral research: operations management/operations research, supply chain strategy, public policy for supply chain, and innovation and technology in supply chain. The tracks are offered depending upon student enrolment and availability of faculty resources.

All students are required to serve as a teaching assistant in two MSCM courses for a related topic. At least one of the courses the student is a teaching assistant for should be a course with recitations. The list of such classes will be determined at a later stage. The subjects in each track will be counted towards the requirement of twelve graduate level classes.

 

Track I: Operations Management / Operations Research

Students choosing to pursue the OM/OR track must satisfy the requirements of the general degree track with the following additional requirement:

The student must take core courses of the track, which include:

  • The Theory of Operations Management
  • Network Optimization
  • Queues: Theory and Applications
  • Advanced stochastic processes

The doctoral thesis of the student should be in a topic related to OM/OR. One member of the student’s doctoral thesis committee, who should be among faculty from the MISI faculty who specialize in OM/OR, will be responsible to approve whether the thesis topic connects to OM/OR.

 

OM/OR Track Courses Description
The Theory of Operations Management Focus on theoretical work for studying operations planning and control problems. Topics include supply chain design and coordination, logistic and distribution systems, make-to-order systems, service operations, procurement, pricing, revenue management, the sales/production interface, inventory theory, flexible manufacturing systems.
Network Optimization Introduce the theory and practice of network flows and its extensions. Network flow problems form a subclass of linear programming problems with applications to transportation, logistics, manufacturing, computer science, project management, and finance, as well as a number of other domains.
Queues: Theory and Applications Modeling and analysis of queuing systems, with applications in manufacturing, call centers, service industries and transportation. Topics include birth- death processes and simple Markovian queues, networks of queues and product form networks, single and multi-server queues, multi-class queuing networks, fluid models, adversarial, queuing networks, heavy-traffic theory and diffusion approximations. Covers state of the art results, which lead to research opportunities.
Advanced Stochastic Processes Analysis and modeling of stochastic processes. Topics include measure theoretic probability, martingales, filtration, and stopping theorems; elements of large deviations theory; Brownian motion and reflected Brownian motion; stochastic integration and Ito calculus; functional limit theorems. Applications to finance theory, insurance, queuing and inventory models.
Track II: Supply Chain Strategy

Students choosing to pursue the supply chain strategy track must also satisfy the requirements of the general degree track with the following additional requirements:

The student must take core courses of the track which includes:

  • Management Theories
  • Microeconomic Theory
  • The Foundations of Strategy
  • Doctoral Seminar in Supply Chain Strategy

 

Supply Chain Strategy Track Courses Description
Microeconomic Theory Covers consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, and general equilibrium. Covers the tools of identification in price and general equilibrium theory, the fundamental welfare theorems, aggregation, and applications. Introduction to game theory. In addition the topics include normal form and extensive form games, and games with incomplete information.
Management Theories Covers classic and contemporary theories and research related to individuals, groups, and organizations. Designed primarily for doctoral students who wish to familiarize themselves with research by psychologists, sociologists, and management scholars in the area commonly known as micro organizational behavior. Topics may include motivation, decision making, negotiation, power, influence, group dynamics, and leadership.
The Foundations of Strategy To explore key concepts that has shaped the field of strategic management and strategy consulting over the past several decades. Topics include the role of randomness in strategic outcomes, the difference between strategic thinking versus planning, and enduring principles related to competitive advantage. Key themes include the role of platform strategies and services, capabilities, pull mechanisms, economies of scope, and flexibility, with examples from a variety of industries. Develops an understanding of what has made some firms successful in the past as well as what managers can do to compete in an uncertain future.
Doctoral Seminar in Supply Chain Strategy Provide a unifying framework for analyzing strategic issues in manufacturing and service supply chains. Students analyze the relationships between manufacturing and service companies and their suppliers, customers, and competitors. The course covers strategic decisions in technology, facilities, vertical integration, human resources, and other areas, and also explores means of competition such as cost, quality, and innovativeness.
Track III: Public Policy for Supply Chain

Students choosing to pursue the public policy for supply chain track must satisfy the requirements of the general degree track with the following additional requirements:

The student must take core courses of the track which includes:

  • Science, Technology and Public Policy
  • Urban and Regional Economics
  • Technology, Globalization and Sustainable Development
  • Doctoral Seminar in Public Policy in Logistics and Supply Chain

 

Public Policy in Logistics and SC Track Courses Description
Science, Technology and Public Policy Analysis of issues at the intersection of science, technology, public policy, and business. Cases drawn from antitrust and intellectual property rights, health and environmental policy, strategic trade and industrial policy; and R&D funding. Structured around theories of political economy, modified to take account of integration of uncertain technical information into public and private decision-making.
Urban and Regional Economics Focuses on the theory of urban land and housing markets, and the spatial development of cities. Examines the roles played by transportation systems and local governments in shaping urban location patterns. Discusses interregional competition, economic development, and the migration of labor and capital.
Technology, Globalization and Sustainable Development The Schumpeterian notion of technological innovation as “the engine of growth” is being challenged as an additional globalization of trade is increasingly seen as an additional driving force of industrial economies. The financial crisis of 2008 has created the perfect storm compromising sustainable development, which must be viewed broadly to include not only a healthy economic base, but also a sound environment, stable employment, adequate purchasing power, distributional equity, national self- reliance, and maintenance of cultural integrity. The subject explores the many dimensions of sustainability and the use of national, multi- national, and international political and legal mechanisms to further sustainable development through transformation of the industrial state. Topics covered include economic health, sound environment, employment, income distribution, national self- reliance, and maintenance of cultural integrity.
Doctoral Seminar in Public Policy in Logistics and Supply Chain A doctoral level seminar to critically review the articles and publications in public policy in logistics and supply chain. Including the subjects such as infrastructure development for logistics and supply chain in government, regulations to facilitate the supply chain flows in government level, short-term and long-term planning for logistics in the government etc.
Track IV: Innovation and Technology in Supply Chain

Students choosing to pursue the decision science and IT track must satisfy the requirements of the general degree track with the following additional requirements:

The student must take core courses of the track which includes:

  • Individual, Groups and Organizations
  • Corporate Entrepreneurship: Strategies for Technology-Based New Business Development
  • Building Entrepreneurial Advantage
  • Doctoral Seminar in Supply Chain Innovation and Technology

 

Innovation and Technology Track Courses Description
Management Theories Covers classic and contemporary theories and research related to individuals, groups, and organizations. Designed primarily for doctoral students who wish to familiarize themselves with research by psychologists, sociologists, and management scholars in the area commonly known as micro organizational behavior. Topics may include motivation, decision-making, negotiation, power, influence, group dynamics, and leadership.
Corporate Entrepreneurship: Strategies for Technology-Based New Business Development Examines strategic and organizational issues for existing firms in developing new technologies and new business areas, from the perspectives of both large corporations and emerging technology-based enterprises. Examines internal entrepreneurial ventures, alliances (especially between large and new companies), joint ventures, acquisitions, corporate venture capital investments, and licensing as alternative business development approaches. Covers aspects of corporate business development other than mergers and acquisitions.
Building Entrepreneurial Advantage Analyzes in depth the challenges in identifying, funding and managing innovation-based entrepreneurial ventures. Examines different developmental patterns adopted by start-ups, many of which involve linkages between new and established firms. Explores the ways that entrepreneurial ecosystems help to expand innovation and entrepreneurial capacity beyond traditional firm boundaries.
Doctoral Seminar in Supply Chain Innovation and Technology A doctoral level seminar to critically review the recent publications on innovation and technology and their implications for supply chain. Some of the topics includes: investigation of new innovation and technology related to money flow in supply chain like bitcoin, new techs such as Nano-tech and bio tech and their impact on supply chain physical flows, social network and internet of things and its implications on supply chain information and knowledge flow etc.