Program Information

DATE:

Jan 18, 2021

DURATION:

2-3 Weeks

LOCATION:

Online

LANGUAGE:

English

5th Annual PhD Winter Academy (Online)

Designing and Managing Operations/Supply Chains in volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous world

Program Overview

The PhD Winter Academy at The Malaysia Institute for Supply Chain Innovation (MISI) promises an intense period of learning, debating cutting edge theory, and discovering new research in operations and supply chain management.

Distinguished professors from prestigious academic institutions will lead courses on topics in their respective areas of expertise.

What will set you apart

  • Attend lectures and get information on latest research in the field of supply chain and operations
  • Discuss and get feedback on research projects with leading scholars and peers
  • Meet and network with leading scholars and peers from academic institutions around the world
  • Explore research and other academic collaboration
  • Get assistance and guidance in developing an academic career

Is this program for you?

The Malaysia Institute for Supply Chain Innovation’s PhD Winter Academy is designed for doctoral students from around the world who would like to keep abreast with the latest research and developments in the supply chain and operations management field. The Academy aims to be a meeting place where doctoral students will have the opportunity to meet with well-known professors in this field. The Academy also offers a great opportunity for students to meet and build a strong network with their peers and the professors.

The main objective of this Academy is to create a platform where doctoral students and junior faculty can meet with leading scholars from around the world to share, discuss and exchange ideas and knowledge on latest research and developments in the field of supply chain management and operations. Through such an exchange, the program aims to encourage the generation of new ideas and research efforts to advance the field of supply chain and operations.

The Academy will offer three to four class modules developed based on various research methods (archival, survey, modelling and qualitative research designs). Every year the Academy focuses on certain research method. The professors invited to the Academy and modules offered will be based on the pre-determined research method. The Academy will usually run for 2 to 3 weeks depending on the number of professors participating. In addition to classes, there will be other activities such as industrial and cultural visits.

Professor Martin Christopher

Martin Christopher has been at the forefront of the development of new thinking in logistics and supply chain management for over thirty years.
His contribution to the theory and practice of logistics and supply chain management is reflected in the many international awards that he has received. His published work is widely cited by other scholars and he has been invited to participate in academic and industry events around the world.
Martin Christopher was one of the first to recognise that the real competition is between supply chains not companies and he has sought to identify ways in which supply chain excellence can be achieved and sustained.
At Cranfield School of Management, one of the worlds premier business schools, Martin Christopher has helped build the Centre for Logistics and Supply Chain Management into a leading centre of excellence. Under his leadership the centre became one of the foremost focal points for innovative teaching and research in logistics and supply chain management.
Now, after leading the Centre for over twenty years, Martin Christopher has become an Emeritus Professor and has broadened his portfolio of activities in the realm of knowledge creation and dissemination in these critical areas.

Professor Thomas Choi

Thomas Choi is a Professor of Supply Chain Management at the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University. His research interest is on the upstream side of supply chains. He has published articles in the Decision Sciences, Harvard Business Review, Journal of Operations Management, Journal of Supply Chain ManagementProduction and Operations Management, and others. He currently serves as co-director of the Complex Adaptive Supply Networks Research Accelerator (CASN-RA). From 2014 to 2019, he served as Executive Director of CAPS Research. From 2011 to 2014, he served as co-editor in chief for the Journal of Operations Management. Since 2018, he has been listed as a Highly Cited Researcher by Clarivate Web of Science.

There is a required tuition fee of USD 100 for international students and MYR 100 for locals.

Program Structures

Even before the widespread disruptions to the economic, commercial and social environments caused by the Covid19 pandemic there were clear signs that the business climate was becoming much more turbulent and unpredictable.  This state of affairs has been labelled by some as a “VUCA” world, i.e. an operating context that is Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous.

In this series of six lectures Professor Martin Christopher will explore the implications of these changed conditions for logistics and supply chain management.

L&SCM:    Christopher, M., (2016),  Logistics and Supply Chain Management,  5th Edition  Published by Pearson

Time: 4:00 to 5:00 PM GMT+8

Because even the best managed supply chains will hit unexpected turbulence or be impacted by events that are impossible to predict, it is critical that they embody the highest degree of resilience. Resilience implies the ability of a system to return to its original or desired state after being disturbed.  Supply chain resilience has two key components: resistance and recovery.  Resistance refers to the robustness of the supply chain which enables it to avoid the shocks that will inevitably impact it.  Recovery relates to the ability of the supply chain to get back on its feet quickly after the occurrence of a disruptive event.

This session will explore the ways in which greater levels of supply chain resilience can be achieved.

Reading:  L&SCM   Chapter 12

Time: 5:30 to 6:30 PM GMT+8

A common feature of modern supply chains is the high level of complexity that they exhibit.  Supply chain complexity has many sources including: the multi-level network of suppliers and customers with many nodes and links; the underpinning business processes that often involve many steps and activities; the extent of the product range and the limited commonality of the products’ bills of material.

Some of this complexity can add to customer value but much of it only adds cost.  The challenge today is to better understand the things that customers value, and hence will pay for, whilst at the same time reducing or eliminating those elements that add no value.

This session will suggest ways in which supply chain complexity can be effectively managed.

Reading:  L&SCM  Chapter 9

Time: 4:00 to 5:00 PM GMT+8

In today’s uncertain business environment the ability to move quickly has never been more critical.  It is no longer feasible to rely on forecasts to plan supply chain operations.  Instead the challenge is to make the transformation from a forecast-driven business to one that is demand-driven.  Demand-driven organisations strive to respond to known customer requirements and to do this in ever shorter time frames.  To achieve this level of responsiveness requires an emphasis on creating agility within the business and across the supply chain.

Agility can be defined as the ability to respond to unpredictable changes in demand or supply and this session will focus on the ways in which organisations and their supply chains can achieve that goal.

Reading:   L&SCM Chapters 6 & 7

Time: 5:30 to 6:30 PM GMT+8

For many years procurement has been primarily cost-based with a focus on reducing spend through more efficient buying processes such as category management.  Cost reduction will always be a critical priority in business – particularly when margins are under pressure.  However in recent times there has been a growing recognition that enduring competitive advantage rarely comes from cost reduction alone.  Instead the focus has to shift to understanding the ways in which procurement can enable the business to deliver more value in the marketplace.

Previously the marketing and procurement functions within the organisation have not always worked closely together and often there has been no strategic alignment between the two.  Now, because of a fundamental change in the market from product-based to service-based offers, there needs to be a re-evaluation of the procurement/marketing interface and how supply management can broaden its scope.

Reading:  L&SCM   Chapter 8

Time: 4:00 to 5:00 PM GMT+8

It is now widely accepted that “supply chains compete, not companies”.  In other words organisations gain competitive advantage not just through their own internal capabilities but rather through the combined capabilities of all the entities in the network.  However it has often been the case that relationships with suppliers, and even customers, have been at best arms-length and at worst adversarial.  It is still the case today that some companies will seek to achieve cost reductions and profit improvement at the expense of their supply chain partners.  Companies such as these do not realise that simply transferring costs upstream or downstream does not make them any more competitive.

This session will focus on the practical ways in which supply chains can seek to maximise their ‘collaborative advantage’ and create lasting win-win relationships.

Reading:  L&SCM  Chapter 13

Time: 5:30 to 6:30 PM GMT+8

The problem is that many companies have invested in specific supply chain solutions which are often fixed for a period of time e.g. factories, distribution centres, supply arrangements etc. As a result they may find it difficult to re-configure the network as conditions change. Hence, the likelihood is that the network is no longer ‘optimal’ for current conditions.  Because today’s highly inter-connected global supply/demand networks are akin to complex systems they can never actually be ‘optimised’. All that supply chain decision makers can hope to do is to create solutions that are flexible enough to provide “satisfactory” solutions in an ever-changing environment. We refer to this ability to quickly change the actual shape of a supply/demand network as structural flexibility.

Structural flexibility can be defined as the ability of a firm to re-configure its supply/demand network in response to changes in the business environment. Companies that lack this vital capability find it difficult or impossible to cope with a fast-changing world. Systems that are rigid and not open to change are susceptible to entropy i.e. gradual decay and increasing disorder. The laws of thermo-dynamics inform us that entropy is the inevitable outcome when a system is closed rather than open. An open system can refresh itself by constantly drawing upon external inputs and resources from new sources.

What does this imply for the design or re-design of our supply chains?

Reading:  L&SCM  Chapter 16

Supply chains are fundamentally networks. In this seminar, we will consider network related issues in supply chain management. We view supply networks as a complex adaptive system consisting of firms as agents.

Networks are made up of two elements—agents and their relationships (i.e. nodes and links), and the smallest unit that contains both of these elements is a dyad (i.e. buyer-supplier relationship, supplier-supplier relationship).

However, triads are the smallest unit in which we can consider how a link affects another link or how a node affects a link once removed. Multi-tier consideration is proposed as the next frontier for supply chain managers.

Under the paradigm of a new normal, the network and multi-tier perspective becomes imperative. We will consider a new type of critical suppliers called nexus suppliers that may be several tiers removed in the supply chain hidden from the final assembler’s view. We will consider how capital flows through supply chains and the implications of deep-tier financing that involves nexus suppliers. We will also consider the implications of emerging technologies and supply chain technology platforms. We will also touch on how cyber security is a supply chain problem.

The readings listed below will all be provided to the students by the instructor. Readings for each class are grouped into two—required and suggested readings.

The seminar will flow primarily based on a two-way dialogue between the instructor and students. Students will be invited to make presentations. On the last day of the seminar, we will have an opportunity to brainstorm for new research ideas given the emerging ideas and various theoretical dispositions.

 

Please view the following video clip, as an introduction to this seminar. It frames supply networks as a complex adaptive system.

Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/414925047

YouTube: https://youtu.be/8W_LhOF7n1g

 

Time: 8:00 to 11:00 PM GMT+8

Required Reading

Liker, Jeffrey and Thomas Y. Choi, “Building Deep Supplier Relationships,” Harvard Business Review, December, 2004: 104-113.

Kim, Yusoon and Thomas Y. Choi, “Deep, Sticky, Transient, and Gracious: An Expanded Buyer-Supplier Relationship Typology,” Journal of Supply Chain Management, 51, 3, 2016.

Villena, Veronica, Elena Revilla, and Thomas Y. Choi, “The Dark Side of Collaborative Buyer-Supplier Relationships: A Social Capital Perspective,” Journal of Operations Management, 29, 2011: 561-576.

 

Suggested Reading

Kim, Yusoon and Thomas Y. Choi, “Supplier Relationship Strategies and Outcome Dualities: An Empirical Study of Embeddedness Perspective,” forthcoming in the International Journal of Production Economics.

Villena, Veronica, Thomas Y. Choi, and Elena Revilla, “Mitigating Mechanisms for the Dark Side of Collaborative Buyer-Supplier Relationships: A Mixed-Method Study,” forthcoming in the Journal of Supply Chain Management.

Andersen, Poul Houman, Luitzen de Boer, and Thomas Y. Choi, “Within-Organizational Structures and Roots of the Buyer-Supplier Relationship,” The Oxford Handbook of Supply Chain Management, T.Y. Choi, J.J. Li, D.S. Rogers, T. Schoenherr, and S.M. Wagner (Eds.), 2020.

Time: 8:00 to 11:00 PM GMT+8

Lecture 3:  Supplier-Supplier Relationships

Required Reading

Wu, Zhaohui and Thomas Choi, “Supplier-Supplier Relationships in the Buyer-Supplier Triad: Building Theories from Eight Case Studies.” Journal of Operations Management, 24, 1, 2005: 27-52.

Wiengarten, Frank, Thomas Choi and Di Fan, “Supplier Ecosystems: Managing Complexities in the Supplier Chain,” Supply Chain Management Review, September/October, 2020.

 

Suggested Reading

Choi, Thomas Y., Zhaohui Wu, Lisa Ellram, and Balaji Koka, “Supplier-Supplier Relationships and Their Implications on Buyer-Supplier Relationships,” IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management, 49, 2, 2002: 119-130.

Wu, Zhaohui, Thomas Y. Choi, and Manus Rungtusanatham, “Supplier-Supplier Relationships in Buyer-Supplier-Supplier Triads: Implications for Supplier Performance.” Journal of Operations Management, 28, 2010: 115-123.

 

Lecture 4: Triads in Supply Networks

Required Reading

Choi, Thomas and Zhaohui Wu, “Taking the Leap from Dyads to Triads: Buyer-Supplier Relationships in Supply Networks.” Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management, 15, 2009: 263-266.

Choi, Thomas, and Zhaohui Wu, “Triads in Supply Networks: Theorizing Buyer-Supplier-Supplier Relationships.”  Journal of Supply Chain Management, 45, 1, 2009: 8-25.

 

Suggested Reading

Li, Mei and Thomas Y. Choi, “Triads in Services Outsourcing: Bridge, Bridge Decay and Bridge Transfer,” Journal of Supply Chain Management, 45, 3, 2009: 27-39.

Bastl, Marko, Mark Johnson, Thomas Y. Choi. “Who’s Seeking Whom? Coalition Behavior of a Weaker Player in Buyer-Supplier Relationships,” Journal of Supply Chain Management, 49, 1, 2013: 8-28.

Time: 8:00 to 11:00 PM GMT+8

Required Reading

Mena, Carlos, Andrew Humphries, Thomas Choi, “Towards the Theory of Multi-Tier Supply Chain Management,” Journal of Supply Chain Management, 49, 2, 2013: 78-95.

Bhakoo, Vikram and Thomas Choi, “The Iron Cage Exposed: Institutional Pressures and Heterogeneity across the Healthcare Supply Chain,” Journal of Operations Management, 31, 2013: 432-449.

 

Suggested Reading

Choi, Thomas Y. and Janet L. Hartley, “An exploration of supplier selection practices across the supply chain,” Journal of Operations Management, 14, 4, 1996: 333-344.

Rossetti, Christian and Thomas Y. Choi, “On the Dark Side of Strategic Sourcing: Experiences from the Aerospace Industry,” Academy of Management Executive, 19, 1, 2005: 46-60.

Choi, Thomas and Tom Linton, “Don’t let your supply chain control your business,” Harvard Business Review, December, 2011: 112-117.

 

Required Reading

Mena, Carlos, Andrew Humphries, Thomas Choi, “Towards the Theory of Multi-Tier Supply Chain Management,” Journal of Supply Chain Management, 49, 2, 2013: 78-95.

Bhakoo, Vikram and Thomas Choi, “The Iron Cage Exposed: Institutional Pressures and Heterogeneity across the Healthcare Supply Chain,” Journal of Operations Management, 31, 2013: 432-449.

 

Suggested Reading

Choi, Thomas Y. and Janet L. Hartley, “An exploration of supplier selection practices across the supply chain,” Journal of Operations Management, 14, 4, 1996: 333-344.

Rossetti, Christian and Thomas Y. Choi, “On the Dark Side of Strategic Sourcing: Experiences from the Aerospace Industry,” Academy of Management Executive, 19, 1, 2005: 46-60.

Choi, Thomas and Tom Linton, “Don’t let your supply chain control your business,” Harvard Business Review, December, 2011: 112-117.

Giannoccaro, Ilaria, Anand Nair, and Thomas Y. Choi, “The Impact of Control and Complexity on Supply Network Performance: An Empirically Informed Investigation Using NK Simulation Analysis,” Decision Sciences, 49, 4, 2018: 625-659.

Kauffman, Stuart, Surya Pathak, P.K. Sen and Thomas Choi, “Jury Rigging and Supply Network Design: Evolutionary Tinkering in the Presence of Unknown-Unknowns,” Journal of Supply Chain Management, 54, 1, 2018.

Time: 8:00 to 11:00 PM GMT+8

Required Reading

Choi, Thomas, Dale Rogers and Bindiya Vakil, “Coronavirus Is a Wake-Up Call for Supply Chain Management,” Harvard Business Review. Online, March 27, 2020. https://hbr.org/2020/03/coronavirus-is-a-wake-up-call-for-supply-chain-management?ab=hero-subleft-1

Handfield, Robert, Seongkyoon Jeong, and Thomas Choi. “Emerging procurement technology: Data analytics and cognitive analytics,” International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, 49, 10, 2020: 972-1002.

Hofman, Erik, Simon Templar, Dale Rogers, Thomas Choi, Rudolf Leuschner, and Rohan Korde, “Supply Chain Financing and Pandemic: Managing Cash Flows to Keep Firms and Their Value Networks Healthy,” Working Paper.

Yan, Tingting, Thomas Choi, Yusoon Kim, and Sophie Yang, “A theory of the nexus supplier: A critical supplier from a network perspective,” Journal of Supply Chain Management, 51, 1, 2015: 52-66.

 

Suggested Reading

Rogers, Zac and Thomas Choi, “Purchasing Managers Have a Lead Role to Play in Cyber Defense,” Harvard Business Review, Online, July 10, 2018.

https://hbr.org/2018/07/purchasing-managers-have-a-lead-role-to-play-in-cyber-defense

Rogers, Dale, Rudi Leuschner and Thomas Choi, “The Rise of Fintech in Supply Chains,” Harvard Business Review, Online Forum, June 22, 2016.

https://hbr.org/2016/06/the-rise-of-fintech-in-supply-chains30T

Choi, T., B. Shao, Z. Shi, “Hidden Suppliers Can Make or Break Your Operations,” Harvard Business Review, Online Forum, May 29, 2015. Appeared in “the Future of Operations” forum.

https://hbr.org/2015/05/hidden-suppliers-can-make-or-break-your-operations

Shao, Benjamin, Zhan Shi, Thomas Choi, and Sangho Chae, “A Data-Analytics Approach to Identifying Hidden Critical Suppliers in Supply Networks: Development of Nexus Supplier Index,” Decision Support Systems, 114, 2018: 37-48.

Past Academies

Theme
Behavioural O/SCM

Module
Module 1: The theory of supply chain risk
Module 2: Behavioural supply chain and operations management I
Module 3: Behavioural supply chain and operations management II

Faculties
Prof. Constantine Blome, University of Sussex Business School
Professor Elena Katok, University of Texas at Dallas
Professor Yaozhong Wu, National University of Singapore

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Theme
Experimental Research And Lab Experiments: A Practicum

Module
Module 1 & 2: Motivation, Concepts, & Statistical Methods
Module 3: Lab Experiments in the context Business Ethics
Module 4: Lab Experiment: A Practicum

Faculties
Prof. Xenophon Koufteros, Texas A & M University, Mays Business School

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Theme
Empirical Research Design & Secondary Data in O/SCM

Module
Module 1: Using secondary data in Supply Chain and Operations Management research: Overview, research methods, and research opportunities.
Module 2: Empirical Research in Operations and Supply Chain Management
Module 3: Supply Chain Strategy
Module 4: Methodological fit in Empirical Research

Faculties
Prof. Vinod Singhal, Coordinator for MS with a Major in Management, Charles W. Brady Chair
Prof. John Gray, Associate Professor of Operations, Associate Director, Center for Operational Excellence
Dr. Javad Feizabadi, Malaysia Institute for Supply Chain Innovation (MISI)

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Theme
Entrepreneurial & Innovative Business Models in O/SCM

Module
Module 1: Foundations and the Future of Inventory Control
Module 2: Entrepreneurial / Innovative Operations & Supply Chains
Module 3: Mathematics of Facility Location: An introduction to Combinatorial Optimization

Faculties
Prof. Chelsea White, Georgia Tech, H.Milton Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering
Prof. Nitin Joglekar, Questrom School of Business, Boston University
Prof. Mozart Menezes, Operations Management, Information System, Kedge Business School
Prof. Charles Fine, MIT Sloan School of Management

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